Posts Tagged ‘photographer forum’

Photographer Hurdles | Top 5 People Professional Photographers Should Know

March 28th, 2012

___________________________________________________ “Your network is your net worth.” – DAVID JAY ___________________________________________________ Your business is as strong as the people and businesses with which you’re connected.  If you don’t already have ‘em, here are the top 5 to add to your network: 1. Photographer Mentors A must.  A MUST is to have someone that’s walked ahead […]

 

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“Your network is your net worth.”

- DAVID JAY

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Your business is as strong as the people and businesses with which you’re connected.  If you don’t already have ‘em, here are the top 5 to add to your network:

1. Photographer Mentors

A must.  A MUST is to have someone that’s walked ahead of you, who can guide you, be honest, be critical, be encouraging, and have the experience to back it up.  A mentor is invaluable.  They can really be gifts of God and we’ve been grateful for the people who’ve walked with us.

You can read a book. You can attend a workshop.  You can practice tips from the internet.  But it’s different to be face to face and shoot side by side by a professional who rocks and is willing to challenge you to be better in every way.

Learn from your mentor what it’s like to walk in their footsteps, what the typical day of a wedding photographer looks like.

Stay tuned to the D Park Photography mentorship program coming soon!

2. Small Business Attorney

Contracts, paperwork, liability.  You need to be prepared and protected as a photographer, especially when you’ve got a family for which you’re providing.  You should know your documentation is as solid as it can be.

Need a good recommendation?  Here’s a rock star small business attorney we love:

Andrea Paris

3. Insurance

Godwilling, you’ll never have to use it.  But God forbid you don’t have it in case equipment breaks down, gets stolen, or an event takes a turn for the worse.  Even if nothing ever happens, there are plenty of top tier venues that will require you have insurance to show them in order to photograph there (and they normally don’t request it ’til near the wedding date…which, by then, you may not have time to scramble to get the insurance booked on time).  Be prepared.

We’ve been so happy with our insurance at Pictage.  Great coverage.  Easy process.  Good service.

Pictage

4. Tax Accountant

Personally, it’s hard enough keeping track of tax laws for personal taxes.  But add in a business and there’s plenty of details, exceptions and exclusions that are hard to track.  It’s been awesome to have someone who can take care of those hard-to-track details (especially for someone who prefers to stick to the creative side of photography, not the number crunching).

We’ve fallen in love with our tax accountant if you are looking for one:

Pamela Fisher-Payne: taxgoddess1040@aol.com

5. Wedding Vendors

Network!  Our biggest referral source have been the amazing vendors with which we’ve had the pleasure to work as well as hang out.  They know us.  They know how we met.  They know the struggles we face. They know how hard we work.  They know we care about their business.

Go out there and meet other wedding professionals.  Add value.  Show appreciation and love to the vendors you work with on your shoots and weddings.

Join some wedding networking organizations: Utterly Engaged, WIPA, ABC, Thursday Therapy. There’s tons out there.  Go go go!

what next?

With what hurdles do you need help?  Message away!

With Our Love,

The Parks

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Photographer FAQs | Improving Consultations, Night Photography, Lens Choices and Camera Bags

February 3rd, 2012

There’s still so much we have to learn.  It seems like there’s something new popping up everyday: new gear, new art forms, new business methodologies.  We get SO much from learning from other people and we’re grateful for how many great resources there are for wedding photographers if you want to find them. We’re also […]

 

There’s still so much we have to learn.  It seems like there’s something new popping up everyday: new gear, new art forms, new business methodologies.  We get SO much from learning from other people and we’re grateful for how many great resources there are for wedding photographers if you want to find them.
We’re also happy to help photographers who have questions.  Questions are welcome!  Below are some of the latest FAQs we’ve received and how we responded.  By no means are we experts!  We’re still learning but this is where we are thus far.
We hope it helps!
Question 1: I have my first consultation for a wedding couple. Was wondering if you have any suggestions or tips that can help be more effective in my approach?
  • Getting to really know your couple and make them feel comfortable is the #1 thing. They have to not think it’s a “business” meeting even though it’s obvious to everyone it is. They need to know who you are as a person. That’s why they’re even willing to meet with you. They like your work already. You’re probably the last of maybe 2 or 3 other options. So what it comes down to now is chemistry and how much you’ll really care about their wedding day.
  • Ask them lots of questions. Be genuinely interested in them, their love story, what’s important to them.
  • Listen to the keywords of what’s important to them (maybe it’s family or friends or just relaxing) and use those same keywords when talking about what you would do for them. This is a GREAT video on that (now ramit uses more of a blunt business approach but you’ll need to make it appropriate for your couple (after all it’s their wedding day they’re thinking of…not some traditional business transaction): http://www.iwillteachyoutoberich.com/blog/the-briefcase-technique-to-earn-thousands-of-dollars/
  • When talking about you, your story, your packages – tailor what you say to fit what’s important to them. They really just wanna hear what you’re doing for them not what you’re doing for you.
Question 2: Do you have any tips on how to improve evening wedding images?  What setting and lenses are better?  I prefer primes but have some zooms too.

Night photography, especially in weddings, is so vital and honestly the hardest thing to nail. Most wedding photographers won’t even show their night photos in their portfolio because they’re just only comfortable with natural light. We actually wrote an article advising brides on being sure to check out night photography in their photographer’s portfolio (see below):

http://www.dparkphotography.com/blog/2011/08/what-to-look-for-in-your-wedding-photographer-part-2-night-photography/

As for which lenses to use, it all depends on your style. We use both primes and zooms. We love the bokeh on primes but the convenience of being able to use a zoom and crop in closer or farther so we wouldn’t have to do that in post. Experiment and find out what you love!

Some other great resources to use to learn lighting:

Question 3: Any tips on camera bags?
It’s kind of the same for us with camera bags and video lights. We’ve heard great raves on the Go Boda bag. David loves his Lowepro camera bag (which survived a monkey attack). I’ve been using my Kelly Moore one but it’s more for looks (and all the great pockets) than absolute comfort.